Spotlight: Josh Hutcherson

Now I promised to do a spotlight on Josh Hutcherson clear back on my post about his character Clapton Davis┬áin 2012….so I guess this has been awhile in the making. But I am excited to announce that, in honor of the release of Mockingjay – Part 2 next month, I am going to do a series of spotlights on some of the Hunger Games’ leading men…beginning with the man himself, Josh Hutcherson.

If you don’t think that Hutcherson’s character Peeta is incredible, just you wait. I am so excited to see how Hutcherson portrays his journey in the last film because if anyone could do that justice, it’s Josh Hutcherson.

Josh Hutcherson

Josh Hutcherson’s first acting credits are from 2002, he would have been 10 years old, and has been featured in approximately three works a year since. There is no doubt that he is a hard worker and has escaped the “child star” curse. So while he has been working steadily for the past 13 years, Hutcherson didn’t really become a household name until Hunger Games hit theaters.

Despite all of the red carpets and award shows, Hutcherson’s wardrobe is fairly casual. He sticks to t-shirts and layers button-ups or jackets over them. This no-fail look allows him to get a lot of mileage out of some basic white and black tees. Thin sweaters and henleys are other simple, but essentially no-fail, casual looks.

The Josh Hutcherson Staple

Hutcherson keeps his hair shorter on the sides, as is in fashion, but not in such an extreme way that it dominates his appearance. This look works well when you want the ability to range from carefully coiffed to elegantly disheveled. If you’ve only seen Josh in his Hunger Games role, then you might be surprised that he is a natural brunette. While the blond is fine on Peeta, his natural dark brown works better. Natural hair colors tend to compliment your natural skin tones.

As for facial hair, he rarely has any. Yes, he is relatively young, but he also has a crazy powerful jaw (Saturday Night Live knows). Facial hair is great for defining your jaw, but if that is already one of your most prominent features, you probably don’t need to rely on it.

Although the Hunger Games series is coming to a close, I am looking forward to seeing what Josh Hutcherson is up to next. He’s played the range from Oscar nominated drama The Kids Are All Right, to the vastly underrated animated film Epic, to of course, my favorite trippy indie horror comedy Detention. Don’t miss your last chance to see him as Peeta Mellark in Mockingjay part 2, opening in November.

Juxtaposition

“Juxtaposition” is every college kid’s favorite word. It is a fancy, and convenient way, to describe placing things next to each other to compare them. There is always a way to use it at least once in an essay.

In the context of fashion, I’m using “juxtaposition” to talk about using style to create a more complex image of a person. This idea draws on more essay fodder from my school years, there is always more to the picture. We are not two-dimensional people (nor are events, places, history, etc.), but our first impressions are pretty flat. Here’s simple ways to flesh them out.

I’d been thinking about this post for awhile and had all but given up on it because I couldn’t figure out how to talk about it, when I had a serendipitous encounter at a store. All of the employees were fairly casually dressed, except one. He was wearing nice trousers and a matching suit vest, basically two parts of the three-piece suit. He also had ear gauges and tattoos on his arms.

Balance

Now, I’m never going to endorse gauges, but the point is, this young man took aspects of his appearance and personality that may initially seem unprofessional, and balanced them with sophistication. Because of his choices of tattoos and piercings, he was going to have to work a little harder in other areas to appear professional.

There are plenty of examples of this type of juxtaposition in the celebrity and fashion worlds, Jamie Campbell-Bower, Andre Hamann, and Adam Levine are all recognizable examples. The nature of their careers may make this look less necessary, but that doesn’t mean they don’t appreciate it.

If you don’t have tattoos or piercings you can still use juxtaposition to your favor. A similar method can be done iwth clothes alone.

Juxtaposition

By combining formal or semi-formal pieces with casual clothes creates visual interest and the opportunity for unique expression. This is especially easy to do with outerwear; pair a leather jacket with slacks and a tie, or throw a nice wool coat over a graphic tee or hoodie, to diversify your look. This also expands breadth of your wardrobe without actually buying more clothes.

An even easier way to add personality to your wardrobe?

Pop of color

Juxtapose a bright color with a neutral monochromatic look.

I love black on black, and neutral looks can be striking and classic. Finding a bright pair of shoes, or a belt, or some other piece of clothing can add a lot of personality and interest to a look.

There are tons of ways you can use contrast to up your visual interest and to best flatter yourself. Pair rounded glasses with a square jaw and a round face with angular frames, softer hair compliments an angular face, and so on. Find your favorite means of juxtaposing and embrace it.

I know it is technically time for a Spotlight post, and I feel like I’ve been waiting to do one forever, but this came out…don’t worry I think I know who is next in line for a spotlight, so it hopefully won’t be long.