Spotlight: Brandon Flowers

The thing about Brandon Flowers is…he can do whatever he wants.

He may not be at the top of the Billboard charts every week, but pretty much everyone under a certain age can tell you their favorite Killer’s song (When You Were Young) or has been asked at some point if they are Human or Dancer.

He’s putting out his second solo album this year, but no one is worried because The Killers will never die. And we’ll take Flowers’ genius however we can get it.

If you’re thinking I’m crazy because you’ve never heard of this guy and/or questioning whether these songs really are genius, consider this excerpt from his Wikipedia bio: “Rufus Wainwright wrote a song about Flowers called “Tulsa” for his fifth album Release the Stars[12]Sir Elton John has listed Flowers as one of his top-five heroes while editing The Independents World Aids Day special edition.[13][14] U2‘s Bono described Flowers’ voice to The Globe and Mail saying, “We need him on the radio…His voice!”[15]

But now on to his clothes, where Flowers is nothing less than a chameleon. He’s The Heartbreaker, The Hipster, The Guy Next Door, and The Performer.

The Heartbreaker

In this case The Heartbreaker is the brooding, sensitive songwriter who is too emotionally distant to be fully present. Now, in reality, Brandon Flowers is a family man, but that doesn’t mean that he can’t look the part of The Heartbreaker. Dark and neutral basics make up the look, with a few distinct touches that show just how much better he is than everyone else.

Brandon Flowers - The Heartbreaker

The Hipster

We’ve already established that Brandon Flowers is cooler than you, or anyone else, so the hipster look comes pretty naturally. Flowers is a humble guy, but the suspenders, high-water pants, endless layers, and perfect scruff are all the hallmarks of a perfect hipster. This is arguably Flowers’ go to look.

Brandon Flowers - The Hipster

The Guy Next Door

Brandon Flowers makes no bones about the fact that this is what he is. He is a husband and a father, who happens to have a job he loves. He isn’t always dressed to perform for 90,000 people in Wembley Stadium. Sometimes everyone need to throw on a button-up and a jacket. Clearly some of his style crosses over, making the looks a little more exciting, but they are still pretty basic.

Brandon Flowers - The Guy Next Door

The Performer

Now, this is the Brandon Flowers that we probably first recognize. This is Brandon Flowers in eyeliner and feathers. And oh how he pulls it off. The Performer is brash and flamboyant, he is a god among men, and he can do no wrong. This is not an everyday look. This is for stadiums and music videos, but that doesn’t mean that us normal folk can’t appreciate it.

Brandon Flowers - The Performer

Fine Art

In order to make up for my long absence, and also because this is where my mind went, today’s post will be both long and a bit academically involved.

The history of art is marked by distinct styles, not unlike fashion, that take almost total control for awhile before being discarded in favor of the next trend. But the thing is, these periods of art live on, not only in our museums, but in the clothes we wear. Here are five distinct ones:

Gothic – High and Late Medieval Period

Gothic art and architecture is marked by intricate, layered designs, using flying buttresses and pointed arches to support high stone walls and ceilings. Gothic buildings often feel heavy, dark, and a little dangerous. The clothing counterpart is highly structural, layered, and voluminous (not the baggy pants and trench coats that sat in the hallways of your high school).

Wear: Long Wool Coats, Tailored Pants, Pointed Leather Shoes, Leather Driving Gloves

Gothic Period

Rococo – Late Baroque – 18th Century

Rococo took all the grandeur and glitz of the Baroque period and made it more playful. Using lighter colors, asymmetric designs, and fluid curves, Rococo was just as ornate as Baroque, just lighter. The clothing counterparts are light-weight, airy, pastel, and patterned.

Wear: Open Linen Shirts, Pastel Paisley, Gold

Rococo

Impressionism – 19th Century

Impressionism is one of those self-explanatory names, it is art that gives an impression. Rather than painting images with clear details, the Impressionists used pointillism or distinct  brush strokes to capture the essence of a design or image. The clothing counterparts are small prints, complimentary colors, layered patterns.

Wear: Patterned Jackets, Patterned Shirts and Ties, Blues and Purples

Impressionism

Folk Art – Varied

Folk art is, by some definitions, the opposite of “Fine Art”, but work with me on this one. Folk art is art from humble origins, often untrained, and completely based on the culture of the place of its origins. The clothing counterpart is cozy, chunky knits, and casual.

Wear: “Tribal” Prints, Shawl Collars, Sweaters with Jeans

Folk Art

Pop Art – 1950s

Pop Art challenges old artistic traditions by using pop culture and mass media images to create art. It is easily distinguished by the use of bright and neon colors, geometric shapes, and repetition. The clothing counterpart is bright, bold patterns, and sleek lines.

Wear: Bright Colors with Patterns, Converse All-Stars, Slim Silhouettes

Pop Art

Are there any other art movements you’d like to see as clothes?